Friday, June 17, 2011

The Stranger (1946)

The Stranger is an old suspense thriller. Edward G. Robinson is amazing as usual...The movie is about a Nazi war criminal, played by Orson Wellles marrying a young lady played by Loretta Young. I warned my girls as we watched the movie...

Do you see why you need to know someone very well before agreeing to marry them?

I wanted to just jump up and down and scream at the young lady to be careful, look out with both eyes wide open!

I would not recommend this for small children, it has some disturbing things in it that may frighten and disturb children such as scenes from the holocaust and evil done to the family dog. The ending is not pleasant for the Nazi. Hubs and I are very careful on what we allow in our home, our daughters are ages 17 to 28, plenty mature of course. Evil is portrayed as evil in this movie, not glorified.

You can see it in entirety here: The Stranger (1946) Your local library should also have copies as well as other resources.

A very interesting, suspenseful movie. Edward G. Robinson is a gem! I love his character in the movie. Great character lessons here as well as warnings!


"Charles Rankin is a professor in a respectable Connecticut town about to marry the daughter of a U.S. Supreme Court justice. But his name is fake and his past is filthy. An earnest convert to Christianity, who once ran a Nazi concentration camp, is capable of exposing him. So "Rankin" kills this little old man and buries his body in the forest. But he isn't safe because an investigator from the War Crimes Commission is on his tail. Rankin will need his own wife to help him elude capture. But his fascination with the local clock tower may prove his undoing."
Written by J. Spurlin

May we as Christians remember we have an enemy that is just as sneaky and worse then the Nazi character in this movie...May we keep our eyes wide open! May we spend daily time with the Lord and know His Word for ourselves so we will not be deceived.

James 1:16 says Brethren, be not deceived.

http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-PEqW02sFNOs/Te-_7xFbiRI/AAAAAAAAAHA/FptVWyU5cSw/s1600/DSCN0031.JPG
Our little poodle, Esther and I on our front porch. I didn't cut my hair, it's simply back in a clip.

Here is a nice quote I've recently come across:

"The best reason to pray is that God is really there. In praying, our unbelief gradually starts to melt. God moves smack into the middle of even an ordinary day.... Prayer is a matter of keeping at it.... Thunderclaps and lightning flashes are very unlikely. It is well to start small and quietly."

~Emilie Griffin

5 comments:

Mary R. said...

Nice to see you blogging again. Wasn't The Stranger written by Camus?

Amelia said...

Hi Mary, Thanks so much for coming by, I do believe this movie is a completely different story than the book by Camus, I'm not familiar with the book except for what I see on Wikipedia.

Maxine said...

It sounds good and I don't think I've seen it but I'm afraid of what you said about evil to the family dog. For some reason, I have a quirky thing about mistreatment of animals and it upsets me to see it. So I may pass, but there are indeed many lessons we can teach our children from some of these movies.

Amelia said...

Maxine, *spoiler warning*

The poor dog is poisoned by the evil Nazi. So. Sad. I'm the same way with animals, I love them so...

Maxine said...

Thanks for telling me, Amelia. I can at least take that better than outright torture. I remember how sad I was though when the dog was poisoned in "Rear Window." I may still watch it if I can find it. Thanks, dear.